2 million childcare workers and teachers’ aides in the EU in 2020

Childhood is the stage at which education can most effectively influence children’s development. Childcare workers and teachers’ aides are key professions in children’s development as they provide care and supervision for children, including family day care workers, babysitters, nannies, out of school hours care workers, pre-school and teacher’s assistants.

In 2020, as in 2019, there were almost 2 million childcare workers and teachers’ aides employed in the European Union (EU). The majority of childcare workers and teachers’ aides were women (93 %).

By contrast, the age of these workers was fairly evenly split, with just over a third (35 %) in both the ‘35-49 years’ and the ‘50 years and above’ age groups and a further 31 % in the ‘15-34 years’ age group.

The share of childcare workers and teachers’ aides as a percentage of the total employed population was 1.0 % in the EU in 2020. Among the EU Member States, Denmark stood out with the largest share of people employed in this profession (3.3 %), followed by France and Ireland (both 2.3 %) and Portugal (2.2 %).

In contrast, 15 out of 27 EU Member States had 1 % or less of the total employed population employed as childcare workers and teachers’ aides. The lowest share was seen in Slovenia (0.1 %; low reliability), closely followed by Italy (0.2 %), Romania (0.3 %) and Greece (0.4 %).

For more information:

  • Childcare workers and teachers’ aides in this article are defined under ISCO-08 classification (531 Childcare workers and teachers’ aides). Childcare workers and teachers’ aides provide care and supervision for children in schools, residential homes and childcare facilities. They namely include family day care workers, babysitters, nannies, out of school hours care workers, pre-school and teacher’s assistants but exclude early childhood educators and pre-school teachers.
  • Data is based on the European Union labour force survey (EU-LFS). For more information: methodological Statistics Explained articles.
  • Data for Croatia and Slovenia: low reliability
  • In Germany, since the first quarter of 2020, the Labour Force Survey (LFS) has been integrated into the newly designed German microcensus as a subsample. Unfortunately, for the LFS, technical issues and the COVID-19 crisis have had a large impact on the data collection processes, resulting in low response rates and a biased sample. The published German data are preliminary and may be revised in the future. For more information, see here.

Source dataset: 

www.ec.europa.eu/eurostat/