GE Webinar on Understanding Metal Powder Reuse and Effective Reuse Strategies for Additive Manufacturing (Febr. 24, 2021)

Powder reuse is integral to building a winning business case in industrialisation of metal AM. Significant efforts have been made by industry, academia and government research agencies to understand the effect of multiple uses of different powder alloys on the powder attributes, process and the properties of final parts. This webinar compares reuse strategies based on cost, ease of implementation and process quality.

Join us for the latest webinar in our Webinar Wednesday series and learn about effective metal powder reuse strategies for additive manufacturing.

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Additive technologies are showing promising signs of success in offering alternatives to conventional methods. Even though powder-based additive processes can reduce waste compared to subtractive manufacturing, the cost of powders as raw materials can be expensive, translating into prohibitive costs of process and parts. Significant efforts have been made by industry, academia and government research agencies to understand the effect of multiple uses of different powder alloys on the powder attributes, process and the properties of final parts. Additionally, production demands within the industry have found it necessary to view powder reuse as an integral part of building a winning business case in industrialization of powder-based metal additive manufacturing.

This webinar will give a holistic view of powder reuse by highlighting the importance of understanding the different aspects of the powder cycle loop prior to launching a powder reuse study/campaign. Reuse strategy options will be compared based on cost, ease of implementation and quality of process.

Speakers

Alfred Okello holds a Ph.D. degree in Materials Science & Engineering and is a lead process engineer working in GE Additive’s materials & process organization. Alfred joined GE Additive in 2017 and has held various roles across the additive business during his time with the company. In 2017, he joined the materials behaviour and parameter development departments, where he coordinated materials behaviour for additive materials from powder fusion bed. In 2018, he led efforts to develop material process and post-process parameters for different additive materials. In his current role, he is involved in the front-end efforts of the additive process by qualifying powder suppliers, evaluating powder characteristics, coordinating powder reuse campaigns, drafting of powder specifications and supporting development of GE Additive’s binder jet process.

Before joining GE Additive, Alfred was involved in various projects on processing and characterization of high-temperature materials via additive manufacturing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He has been involved in the metal additive processes from qualification of powder vendors, evaluation of powder characteristics, parameter optimisation, and material characterization for both powder bed fusion and binder jetting platforms.

Victor Samper is a senior staff engineer at GE Additive, located in Munich, Germany. Victor is part of GE Additive’s AddWorks team, supporting industrialization efforts. As an engineer, Victor’s special interests lie in the machine technology that makes additive successful and the processes that bring out the best in additive machines.

Victor joined GE in 2005. Prior to GE Additive, he worked in GE Global Research as principal engineer for Mechatronics. Through his various roles at GE, Victor has gained a broad range of industrial experience and exposure to application spaces spanning healthcare, sub-sea, automotive, power and aviation.

In 1997 Victor obtained his Ph. D. in MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) and micro actuators for a cardiac catheter, working together with the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, a world leader and pioneer in micro structures. After his Ph. D., Victor continued to work in the field of miniature machines and systems. In 1997, Victor left his home in Scotland to work in Singapore, first at the Singapore Institute of Microelectronics (IME) where he reached the position of member of technical staff by 2003, before leaving to join the Singapore Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN). At IBN, Victor served as a principal scientist where he helped create the medical devices team and build the research facilities. In 2005, Victor left Singapore and joined GE Global Research in Munich, Germany.

While additive manufacturing appears to be a long way from MEMS at first sight, both produce mechanical components from novel manufacturing processes and rely on the harmony of consistent machines, materials and process technology to realize their potential.         

Join the webinar, February 24, 2021

Understanding Metal Powder Reuse and Effective Reuse Strategies for Additive Manufacturing

Online registration can be had here

www.ge.com/additive/