The week in Charts by McKinsey

U.S. most likely to reach COVID-19 herd immunity in second half of 2021

While the US is most likely to reach COVID-19 herd immunity in the third or fourth quarter of 2021, it could come as early as the second quarter of 2021, if vaccines are highly effective and launched smoothly, or if significant cross-immunity is discovered in a population. But if early vaccine candidates have efficacy or safety issues, the pandemic could extend until 2022 or later.

To read the article, see “When will the COVID-19 pandemic end?,” September 21, 2020.

Women are feeling more pressure at work due to the COVID-19 crisis than men are

Despite companies’ efforts to support employees during the crisis, women are feeling more exhausted, burned out, and under pressure than men, according to the latest Women in the Workplace study from LeanIn.Org and McKinsey. This suggests companies need to do more to adjust the norms and expectations that lead to these feelings.

To read the article, see “Women in the Workplace 2020,” September 30, 2020.

Women remained significantly outnumbered in management roles at the beginning of 2020

On the first step up the corporate ladder—from an entry-level role to manager—women continued to lose ground for the sixth year in a row, according to the latest Women in the Workplace study from LeanIn.Org and McKinsey. Women held just 38 % of manager-level positions, while men held 62%.

To read the article, see “Women in the Workplace 2020,” September 30, 2020.

About 85 million Americans avoid a top-nine food allergen when grocery shopping

And that number includes only those whose households are affected by some type of intolerance. Another 75 million Americans avoid milk, eggs, wheat, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, soy, or sesame for nondietary reasons.

To read the article, see “Consumers with food allergies: A growing market remains underserved,” September 22, 2020.

Shifting demographics are most to blame for blood-supply shortages in the US

In the Pacific Northwest, for example, donors aged 45 and older account for 63 % of the total blood volume collected from repeat donors. But baby boomers are aging out of the donor pool, and first-time donors aren’t replenishing their ranks.

To read the article, see “Improving the fragile US supply of blood,” September 15, 2020.

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