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by Virginia

ShellyPalmer THINK ABOUT THIS

Saturday, January 14, 2023

OpenAI has announced plans to begin charging for access to ChatGPT, a widely popular AI-powered chatbot capable of composing essays, emails, poems, and even computer code. In a statement on the company’s official Discord server, OpenAI mentioned that they are considering monetising ChatGPT as a means of securing the tool’s long-term sustainability.

As exciting as this is for ChatGPT lovers, it also heralds the requirement for the new skill of “prompt crafting” – the art of succinctly communicating requests to your AI coworker. This term should not be confused with terms of art like prompt engineering or prompt tuning, which each have very specific technical definitions.

Since this is just a term I like, prompt crafting is likely to be replaced with some colloquialism. No matter what you call it, this skill is going to be as important (from a productivity standpoint) as learning to write prose, do arithmetic, or send an email.

Author’s note: This is not a sponsored post. I am the author of this article and it expresses my own opinions. I am not, nor is my company, receiving compensation for it.

About Shelly Palmer

Shelly Palmer is the Professor of Advanced Media in Residence at Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, co-founder of Metacademy, and the CEO of The Palmer Group, a consulting practice that helps Fortune 500 companies with technology, media and marketing. Named LinkedIn’s “Top Voice in Technology,” he covers tech and business for Good Day New York, is a regular commentator on CNN and CNBC and writes a popular daily business blog. He’s the Co-Host of the award-winning podcast Techstream with Shelly Palmer & Seth Everett and his latest book, Blockchain – Cryptocurrency, NFTs & Smart Contracts: An executive guide to the world of decentralized finance, is an Amazon #1 Bestseller. Follow @shellypalmer or visit shellypalmer.com.

For your weekend reading pleasure, I offer a synopsis of interesting articles about AI you may have missed this week. As always, your thoughts and comments are both welcome and encouraged.

P.S. Did you know that our database of the most interesting companies in AI, Web3 and other leading edge technologies is available online? Please feel free to look around and share any fascinating companies that aren’t already included.

This Week’s Most Interesting Stories

Prompt Crafting: “The” New Skill

OpenAI has announced plans to begin charging for access to ChatGPT, a widely popular AI-powered chatbot capable of composing essays, emails, poems, and even computer code. In a statement on the company’s official Discord server, OpenAI mentioned that they are considering monetizing ChatGPT as a means of securing the tool’s long-term sustainability.

As exciting as this is for ChatGPT lovers, it also heralds the requirement for the new skill of “prompt crafting” – the art of succinctly communicating requests to your AI coworker. This term should not be confused with terms of art like prompt engineering or prompt tuning, which each have very specific technical definitions.

Since this is just a term I like, prompt crafting is likely to be replaced with some colloquialism. No matter what you call it, this skill is going to be as important (from a productivity standpoint) as learning to write prose, do arithmetic, or send an email.

Author’s note: This is not a sponsored post. I am the author of this article and it expresses my own opinions. I am not, nor is my company, receiving compensation for it.

www.shellypalmer.com

 

5 Things I Liked at CES 2023

It was great to be back in Las Vegas for CES® 2023. The most obvious trend this year was the focus on partnerships. Companies big and small, from every sector, were touting the benefits of working together. There were dozens of companies showing off amazing technology. In most cases, tech was “new and improved,” as opposed to “brand new.” But there were a few standout products and services, and I’ve chosen five of my favorites to share with you.

1. Withings U-Scan

It was great to be back in Las Vegas for CES® 2023. The most obvious trend this year was the focus on partnerships. Companies big and small, from every sector, were touting the benefits of working together. There were dozens of companies showing off amazing technology. In most cases, tech was “new and improved,” as opposed to “brand new.” But there were a few standout products and services, and I’ve chosen five of my favorites to share with you.

2. Sony Mocopi

Motion capture is the process of digitally recording patterns of movement for the purpose of animating a digital character. This technique usually requires an actor to wear a bodysuit made out of ultimatte-green or non-repro-blue material with dozens of white reference dots at specific joints. It also requires sophisticated lighting and camera equipment.

Mocopi is a consumer version that requires wearing six sensors (wrists, ankles, head, and back) and a smartphone. The camera captures the movement and allows the user to create real-time animation. It will be amazing for social media creators, but it will also be a huge time and money saver for professional production designers and directors who want to previsualize camera angles, lighting, blocking, etc. The system will be available in the United States later this year. Pricing is estimated to be under USD 500.

3. Rollo

The story of CES 2023 was about companies focusing on core competencies and partnerships. There is no better example of this trend than Rollo, a company focused on making shipping cheaper and easier. Rollo has partnerships with the USPS, UPS, FedEx, etc. It has a simple value proposition: no contracts, low shipping costs, super easy to use. Rollo also had the very best copyline at CES 2023: “Not owned by Jeff Bezos.”

4. Lenovo Yoga Book 9i

I’ve always liked the Yoga Book form factor, but Lenovo’s Yoga Book 9i takes flexibility to a new level. It has two 13.3-inch OLED screens which you can put side-by-side or stack over/under. The company says it will retail for under USD 2000 when released later this year.

 

1. Withings U-Scan

U-Scan

Withings says that U-Scan is the first hands-free connected home urine lab. The sensor sits inside the toilet bowl and the system provides an immediate snapshot of the body’s balance by monitoring and detecting a large variety of biomarkers found in urine. The company says that U-Scan can tell which family member is which, so there is no need to think about the device while doing your business.

U-Scan is rechargeable and lasts approximately 90 days on a single charge. At the moment, you can choose one of three different focuses for testing: nutrition and general health, cycle tracking, or a professional cartridge that can be programmed by a medical professional. Withings says it will be partnering with various healthcare organizations to create a variety of specialized testing cartridges.

I’m told that early detection is often the key to successful medical outcomes. Other companies such as ViraWarn, Omron, and MedWand were all showing consumer tech designed for early diagnostic testing. Hopefully, this trend will continue.

2. Sony Mocopi

Motion capture is the process of digitally recording patterns of movement for the purpose of animating a digital character. This technique usually requires an actor to wear a bodysuit made out of ultimatte-green or non-repro-blue material with dozens of white reference dots at specific joints. It also requires sophisticated lighting and camera equipment.

Mocopi is a consumer version that requires wearing six sensors (wrists, ankles, head, and back) and a smartphone. The camera captures the movement and allows the user to create real-time animation. It will be amazing for social media creators, but it will also be a huge time and money saver for professional production designers and directors who want to previsualize camera angles, lighting, blocking, etc. The system will be available in the United States later this year. Pricing is estimated to be under $500.

3. Rollo

Rollo

The story of CES 2023 was about companies focusing on core competencies and partnerships. There is no better example of this trend than Rollo, a company focused on making shipping cheaper and easier. Rollo has partnerships with the USPS, UPS, FedEx, etc. It has a simple value proposition: no contracts, low shipping costs, super easy to use. Rollo also had the very best copyline at CES 2023: “Not owned by Jeff Bezos.”

4. Lenovo Yoga Book 9i

Lenovo Yoga Book 9i

I’ve always liked the Yoga Book form factor, but Lenovo’s Yoga Book 9i takes flexibility to a new level. It has two 13.3-inch OLED screens which you can put side-by-side or stack over/under. The company says it will retail for under $2,000 when released later this year.

5. L’Oréal Hapta

Hapta

Hapta is an assistive lipstick applicator based on the stabilizing silverware and cutlery produced by Verily. The Hapta has a magnetic attachment with 360 degrees of rotation and 180 degrees of flexion, while the head can be locked into position during use. The device will give agency and dignity to millions of people who do not possess the fine motor skills required to apply lipstick. Pricing will be USD150–USD 200 when Hapta launches later this year.

Looking Forward

CES always provides a forward-looking crystal ball. You can see what will be shipping for the next two holiday seasons and get a glimpse of what may ship in the future.

CES 2023 did not disappoint. Devices like Mocopi and Hapta will ship this year, and they will change the way their respective processes were done in the past. Products like the Lenovo Yoga Book and services like Rollo follow a predictable path of continuous improvement. And technologies like U-Scan are positioned to disrupt entire industries. This is the magic of CES. The future is always on display—if you know where to look.

Author’s note: This is not a sponsored post. I am the author of this article and it expresses my own opinions. I am not, nor is my company, receiving compensation for it. I am not a financial advisor. Nothing contained herein should be considered financial advice. If you are considering any type of investment you should conduct your own research and, if necessary, seek the advice of a licensed financial advisor..

www.shellypalmer.com