Alessandro Michele is leaving Gucci – Philanthropist Agnes Gund on How to Ask People for Money – The Ferragamo Family Transforms a Seminary Into a Luxury Hotel – Fashion: 1960s-Style Tights Are Back. How to Wear Them in 2022

Alessandro Michele is leaving Gucci – Philanthropist Agnes Gund on How to Ask People for Money – The Ferragamo Family Transforms a Seminary Into a Luxury Hotel – Fashion: 1960s-Style Tights Are Back. How to Wear Them in 2022

 

Dear Readers,

Today, the editorial team of TextileFuture’s Newsletter is proposing four features for your reading.

The first item was firstly published in Vogue Business and is elaborating the fact that “Alessandro Michele is leaving Gucci”. It gies you the background and it is generously illustrated with a selection of his collections.

The second item is an Interiew with “Philanthropist Agnes Gund on How to Ask People for Money”, it was firstly published in the Wall Street Magazine.

The third feature shows how “The Ferragamo Family Transforms a Seminary Into a Luxury Hotel in Milan”, the process of transformation took four years.

The fourth item is about fashion and shows the revial of “1960s-Style Tights Are Back. How to Wear Them in 2022”, it shows five outstanding tights.

We do hope that you will enjoy reading all features.

Please call back next Tuesday for the next issue of TextileFutur’s Newsletter. If you prefer to have it deliered directly to your email in-box, feel free to sign a free of cost subscription of TextileFuture’s Newsletter.

We wish you an extraordinary week ahead with many personal highlights in your business career or priate life, accompanied with our best wishes.

The Editorial Team of TextileFuture

 

Here starts the first item:

Alessandro Michele is leaving Gucci

In a statement on Wednesday, November 23, 2022, Kering announced that Gucci creative director Alessandro Michele would be leaving the role after seven years. No successor has been announced.

By Luke Leitch from Vogue Business

November 23, 2022

Alessandro Michele

Gucci today announced the departure of its creative director Alessandro Michele after seven years in the role, effective immediately. In a statement released on Wednesday evening, the house paid tribute to Michele’s “groundbreaking creativity”.

“I was fortunate to have had the opportunity to meet Alessandro at the end of 2014, since then, we have had the pleasure to work closely together as Gucci has charted its successful path over these last eight years. I would like to thank him for his 20 years of commitment to Gucci and for his vision, devotion and unconditional love for this unique house during his tenure as creative director,” CEO Marco Bizzarri said in a statement.

Michele said in a statement: “There are times when paths part ways because of the different perspectives each one of us may have. Today an extraordinary journey ends for me, lasting more than 20 years, within a company to which I have tirelessly dedicated all my love and creative passion. During this long period, Gucci has been my home, my adopted family. To this extended family, to all the individuals who have looked after and supported it, I send my most sincere thanks, my biggest and most heartfelt embrace.”

Gucci’s design team will lead the house forward until a new “creative organisation” is announced, according to Kering’s announcement.

François-Henri Pinault, chairman and CEO of Kering, said of Michele: “His passion, his imagination, his ingenuity and his culture put Gucci centre stage, where its place is. I wish him a great next chapter in his creative journey.”

So, why part ways with Michele? On the face of it, Michele’s contribution to the fortunes of both Gucci and its parent company, Kering, has been transformative. Kering’s share price stood at EUR 155 on the day of Michele’s first show for Gucci in 2015. On Wednesday morning, it was hovering at around EDUR 538. In 2014, the year before Michele took up his position at Gucci, Kering group’s revenues were just over €10 billion, of which EUR 3.9 billion was generated by the brand. Over the next few years Gucci recorded consistently explosive growth and by 2021 Kering group revenues were €17.63 billion, of which around 55 % is understood to be generated by Gucci.

Recently, however, the house has recorded sluggish growth compared to other Kering brands, most notably Yves Saint Laurent. This has slowed Kering’s performance in a luxury market that is still rebounding from the pandemic and confounding broader economic signs of recession.

To re-energise its lacklustre performance, Kering chairman François-Henri Pinault last year announced a turnaround plan for the 101-year-old house. Today’s news suggests Pinault is not convinced that Michele can reinvent Gucci for a second time. Luca Solca, senior analyst for luxury goods at consultancy Bernstein, told Vogue Business: “In order to reaccelerate, Gucci doesn’t need to move to the mainstream or to become timeless. It needs to open a new creative chapter. This, in all likelihood, can only be done with new creative energy and talent hence the sooner Alessandro goes, the better.”

Michele, who will celebrate his 50th birthday this Friday, November 25, 2022, joined Gucci’s design team, then led by Tom Ford, 20 years ago as an accessories specialist. In January 2015, Gucci’s then-creative director Frida Giannini abruptly exited the company, and CEO Marco Bizzarri challenged Michele to design and present the house’s Autumn/Winter menswear show in only five days. The resulting collection, presented in place of Giannini’s, laid down the early Michele template of gender fluidity, and presented his first hit accessory: the kangaroo-lined Gucci loafer. He was formally appointed creative director two days later.

Michele’s dreamily bohemian codes of time-travelling maximalism reset the fashion language of the mid-2010s. They have continued to drive critically acclaimed collections, of which the most recent was September’s “Welcome to Twinsburg” show. He became known for a policy of creative inclusion, building collections with partners including Gucci Ghost and Dapper Dan. His most influential partnerships were with Jared Leto and Harry Styles.

Now, speculation will inevitably shift as to who might succeed Michele in order to galvanise Gucci afresh. Kering’s chief challenge is to answer the question Michele himself posed on the invitation for his Autumn 2017 show: “What will we do with all this future?”

So, why part ways with Michele? On the face of it, Michele’s contribution to the fortunes of both Gucci and its parent company, Kering, has been transformative. Kering’s share price stood at EUR 155 on the day of Michele’s first show for Gucci in 2015. On Wednesday morning, it was hovering at around EUR 538. In 2014, the year before Michele took up his position at Gucci, Kering group’s revenues were just over EUR 10 billion, of which EUR 3.9 billion was generated by the brand. Over the next few years Gucci recorded consistently explosive growth and by 2021 Kering group revenues were EUR 17.63 billion, of which around 55 % is understood to be generated by Gucci.

Recently, however, the house has recorded sluggish growth compared to other Kering brands, most notably Yves Saint Laurent. This has slowed Kering’s performance in a luxury market that is still rebounding from the pandemic and confounding broader economic signs of recession.

To re-energise its lacklustre performance, Kering chairman François-Henri Pinault last year announced a turnaround plan for the 101-year-old house. Today’s news suggests Pinault is not convinced that Michele can reinvent Gucci for a second time. Luca Solca, senior analyst for luxury goods at consultancy Bernstein, told Vogue Business: “In order to reaccelerate, Gucci doesn’t need to move to the mainstream or to become timeless. It needs to open a new creative chapter. This, in all likelihood, can only be done with new creative energy and talent hence the sooner Alessandro goes, the better.”

Michele, who will celebrate his 50th birthday this Friday, joined Gucci’s design team, then led by Tom Ford, 20 years ago as an accessories specialist. In January 2015, Gucci’s then-creative director Frida Giannini abruptly exited the company, and CEO Marco Bizzarri challenged Michele to design and present the house’s Autumn/Winter menswear show in only five days. The resulting collection, presented in place of Giannini’s, laid down the early Michele template of gender fluidity, and presented his first hit accessory: the kangaroo-lined Gucci loafer. He was formally appointed creative director two days later.

Michele’s dreamily bohemian codes of time-travelling maximalism reset the fashion language of the mid-2010s. They have continued to drive critically acclaimed collections, of which the most recent was September’s “Welcome to Twinsburg” show. He became known for a policy of creative inclusion, building collections with partners including Gucci Ghost and Dapper Dan. His most influential partnerships were with Jared Leto and Harry Styles.

Now, speculation will inevitably shift as to who might succeed Michele in order to galvanise Gucci afresh. Kering’s chief challenge is to answer the question Michele himself posed on the invitation for his Autumn 2017 show: “What will we do with all this future?”

One neat option might be Tom Ford, who was creative director of Gucci from 1995 to 2004, and whom Michele has described as a “genius”. After selling his eponymous brand to Estée Lauder for USD 2.8 billion earlier this month, Ford is contracted to remain in place as its creative director until the end of 2023 — by which time Michele’s remaining collections will likely have drawn to a close. Kering itself was interested in acquiring Ford’s brand, and may welcome the return of a designer whose luxurious minimalism first propelled Gucci to fashion relevance in the 1990s. Ford himself, however, might have other priorities.

More broadly, Gucci now faces a strategic choice. The first course of action might be to headhunt an established creative director with tried and tested credentials, either from within its own stable of brands or elsewhere. This is the easier, and possibly safer option. Obvious names to consider from inside Kering include Matthieu Blazy, currently at Bottega Veneta, as well as Anthony Vaccarello, currently at Yves Saint Laurent. Other names that will surely be mooted include Riccardo Tisci and Phoebe Philo, whose long-anticipated startup is yet to materialise. Of the young independents, Peter Do might make for a strong candidate.

The second, possibly preferable, option would be to try and repeat the trick Bizzarri pulled off by appointing Michele, a then complete unknown, to the top job. The great advantage of this is that the new designer’s codes — if and when successfully established — become emblematic of Gucci without any contamination by prior association. Whoever Kering settles on, the new designer faces moving into a house whose entire identity, especially in retail, is saturated by the eclectic aesthetic of the man they will be replacing.

The other question is Michele’s next destination. Should he not have a long period of gardening leave in his contract, his very specific skills might well be of interest to Kering’s eternal rival, LVMH. After all, that menswear role at Louis Vuitton is still waiting to be filled.

Following are the outstanding creations by Alessandro Michele, a collection by  Luke Leitch from Vogue Business:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

www.voguebusiness.com

Here is the beginning of the second item:

Philanthropist Agnes Gund on How to Ask People for Money

A major art patron, Gund, 84, also spoke about mysteriously good coffee and what she thinks of NFTs

By Lane Florsheim from the Wall Street Magazine

Nov. 21, 2022

Agnes Gund is one of the most famous art patrons in the world. You won’t find any NFTs in her collection.

“NFTs?” she replied when asked about digital-art ownership tokens in a recent interview. “You mean not-to-be-forgottens?” After clarification, Ms. Gund, 84, said she didn’t have any and prefers keeping up with the artists she has known for years.

In 2017, she made headlines for selling a beloved Roy Lichtenstein painting, Masterpiece (1962), for USD165 million and using USD 100 million of the proceeds to create the Art for Justice Fund, which is focused on prison reform and reducing mass incarceration, in part through giving grants to artists whose work deals with imprisonment. It’s one of many art-focused philanthropies she has poured resources into over the last half-century. In 1977, she founded Studio in a School, a nonprofit that places professional artists in classrooms to teach young students. She has donated more than 800 works to the Museum of Modern Art in New York. When you walk into a major American museum, you’re likely to see her impact—whether that’s her name on a plaque or a painting she quietly donated.

Ms. Gund spends most of her days visiting artists’ studios and galleries and attending board meetings. On the weekends, she often decamps to her country home in Connecticut for a bit of relaxation. Here, she speaks to WSJ. about her guilty pleasure and the most important thing she’s learned about fundraising.

What time do you get up on Mondays, and what’s the first thing you do after waking up?

I usually wake up around 5 a.m. and go back to sleep for a little bit. Then I get up around 7:30 or 8 a.m. I do some mild exercises. Then I have breakfast. Then I have my hair done.

When I go up to the country, I get up earlier. I sit down, make breakfast for the dog, whose name is Bronzino, after the painter. Giotto was the name of the dog before him.

What do you eat for breakfast to start the week off right? 

I usually have yogurt from [late philanthropist] Anne Bass’s farm that she had up in Connecticut, where we go on weekends.

How do you boot up for Monday? Caffeine?

I have tea sometimes, but I don’t have coffee except later in the day when [my housekeeper] comes in and makes delicious coffee. We don’t know why it’s so good, but hers is better than anyone else’s. I’ve tried to figure out what it is that makes it so good. We don’t know, but we all drink it.

What’s next?

I have [my art collection curator] Nicole [Gallo] two days a week. She does the art with me, whatever art I’m getting or giving. We usually do that in the morning, and then I have lunch and take a nap. I just can’t go through a whole day without some kind of nap.

How do you divide your time, do you have certain days of the week for studio visits?

We usually go on Mondays and Wednesdays when Nicole is here. We just went to the Lorna Simpson that was uptown.

Are you worried about art education budgets in NYC public schools?

I am very worried. When we started this 45 years ago, we were only in three schools then. We’re in at least 100 schools total. We really see that [children] who don’t come some days to school, they always come when they have Studio [in a School] in their classroom.

You started the Art for Justice fund five years ago. What has it been like? 

From the start, we’ve been most interested in how we release women and how we stop things like solitary [confinement]. We’ve been interested in having Rikers closed—we’ve made some headway. We know some of the people who have come out of prison and we are especially pleased with what some of them have done with the right of return.

What do you do to relax? 

I have a lot more freedom than I used to have to relax. I really am up in the country and see people who I know, some artists and art dealers who live nearby and things like that. They’re interesting people, I like to be around them but they’re much younger and more with it than I am.

I read a lot. I’m reading a book now that is just wonderful. It’s about a horse and it’s called Horse by Geraldine Brooks. I’ve read others of hers, March and Caleb’s Crossing. Reading is my guilty pleasure.

What’s a piece of advice you’ve gotten that’s been important to you?

[Historian and author] Vartan Gregorian told me when you go to ask for somebody to give you money, you don’t ask them when you first meet them. You look at the lay of the land and make friends with them, and then the second time, you can ask them for money.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

www.wsj.com

 

Here starts the third feature:

The Ferragamo Family Transforms a Seminary Into a Luxury Hotel

After a four-year restoration project in Milan, the 73-room Portrait Milano hotel opens next month, expanding the growing hospitality portfolio from the family behind the Italian fashion house.

By Jay Cheshes | Photography by Giulio Ghirardi for WSJ. Magazine

On a Saturday afternoon in September, fashion editors, influencers and celebrity clients of the house of Ferragamo pass security barricades at the entrance to a 17th-century stone gate in the heart of Milan’s fashion district. They pause for photos in front of panels stained a supersaturated shade of Ferragamo red, the fashion brand’s signature color, before filing into a stone courtyard filled with matching red marble gravel.

Light rain falls as models in tight shorts, billowy dresses and gauzy blouses walk along the courtyard’s red runway. The audience—model Naomi Campbell, British Vogue editor Edward Enninful and K-pop star Chaeyoung among them—are sheltered from the precipitation under a stone overhang flanked by Doric columns.

It’s a big day for the Ferragamo family and their eponymous fashion brand, unveiling a new Pantone red and updated logo, along with the debut collection of a new head designer, Maximilian Davis, 27, hired this past March. But the historic venue for their spring Fashion Week show is also in the spotlight.

The imposing landmark, tucked behind a clutch of apartment buildings just off the city’s main fashion artery, the Via Montenapoleone, was established as the Archiepiscopal Seminary of Milan in 1564. Seminarium is still carved into a cornice above the main entrance. The Ferragamos took over the over 200,000-square-foot building, as tenants of the Catholic Church, in 2018. It had been phased out of use about 20 years ago, after the last of its resident aspiring priests were all transferred outside the city decades prior.  Now, four years into a restoration project overseen by Milanese architect Michele De Lucchi, the fashion world is getting a first look at its transformation.

Behind red curtains covering the balconies and windows, work is nearing completion on a sprawling new hospitality complex. A 73-room Portrait Milano hotel will open next month above a new public piazza, with three restaurants, two bars, almost 10,000 square feet of retail, a gym, a spa and an underground swimming pool.

The Ferragamos have been in the hotel business, quietly, for decades, operating venues in and around their native Florence and in Rome that make only the most subtle reference to the family’s fashion heritage. Leonardo runs the Lungarno Collection, small hotels decorated in the understated style of a personal residence, with virtually no mention of the Ferragamo name. Until recently, he’s tried to keep his fashion and hotel interests entirely separate. “We knew nothing, when we started, about the hotel business,” he says. “We did not want to take the risk of [making] a mistake on one side that would have affected the [fashion] brand on the other.”

There are few fashion world tie-ins at his brother Ferrucio’s epicurean resort, Il Borro, outside the city, or at Castiglion del Bosco, a Tuscan retreat with its own golf course and winery run by their younger brother, Massimo, and his wife, Chiara, up until its sale to undisclosed buyers early this year.

The Milan property, the third outpost of Leonardo’s more upscale Portrait Collection brand, which opened its first hotel in 2006, will be the hospitality venture that most clearly flaunts its fashion connection. After offering a first look of the building during its spring Fashion Week show, the hotel will launch with guest rooms—in dark wood, brass and leather trim—that feature memorabilia from the Ferragamo archives, referencing the birth of the brand.

The patriarch, Salvatore, born in the small village of Bonito, east of Naples, in 1898, built his reputation in Hollywood, where he lived for a time in the 1920s, as detailed in a new documentary from Luca Guadagnino, Salvatore: Shoemaker of Dreams. He studied anatomy at the University of Southern California, in order to better understand the human foot. And, out of the Hollywood Boot Shop, which he purchased, he made shoes to order for Mary Pickford, Lillian Gish and Greta Garbo. He also supplied period footwear to movie sets—from The Thief of Baghdad to The Ten Commandments.

The walls in the Milan hotel will be adorned with framed sketches, studies and patents for his shoe design innovations, like the wedge heel, introduced in 1937. “My father, in his life, patented 380 different designs,” says Leonardo.

In the late 1920s Salvatore moved his business from California to Florence and began producing shoes under his own name. The company headquarters later occupied the Palazzo Spini Feroni, an imposing tower facing the Arno River built by a banker to the Pope in the 13th century. Until his death, at 62, in 1960, Salvatore entertained VIP clients, including actors Audrey Hepburn and Anna Magnani, in its lavish apartments. “He understood that it was important to have a special space, a luxury space,” says Stefania Ricci, director of the Salvatore Ferragamo Museum, which opened in the basement of the building in 1995.

Salvatore and his wife, Wanda, had six children, three boys and three girls, who all followed their father into the family business. “I remember as a teenager I couldn’t wait until I could start working,” says Leonardo, who was just 7 when his father died, leaving Wanda, at 39, to take charge of the company. Leonardo landed his first position there when he was 20, in 1973, assisting his cousin Jerry in women’s shoes before overseeing the launch of a men’s line a few years later.

By the 1990s, Leonardo had begun shifting his focus to the family’s real estate holdings. In 1995 he purchased a small hotel group in Florence, three properties facing the Ponte Vecchio. He enlisted Florentine Michele Bönan, a designer with no experience in hotels, to upgrade the flagship Hotel Lungarno. “I said to myself, why do we need to do one more stereotypical hotel?” Leonardo says. “I wanted very much for the hotel to be your own home…. And that became the leitmotif of everything we’ve done since.”

Bönan went on to work on Leonardo’s personal residence, on the interior of his 115-foot sailing yacht and on every hotel project that’s followed over the last 25 years, including the new Portrait Milano. “I think the synergy between the hotel and the fashion brand, it’s the same DNA,” Bönan says.

In 2011, a few years after launching the five-star Portrait brand with a 14-suite property in Rome, the company promoted its COO, hospitality veteran Valeriano Antonioli, to CEO, to oversee the growing hotel portfolio. Antonioli began scouting locations across Italy for new Portrait outposts in Rome, Venice and Milan.

In 2014, they were close to signing on a location in Milan for a small hotel, when Antonioli lined up a tour, through acquaintances, of the seminary building, he says. “As soon as I saw it, I called Leonardo. I said, ‘Mr. President, I think I found the right place.’ ”

The Catholic Church, though, seemed in no rush to find new tenants. It would take four years to convince the priests in charge to lease Leonardo’s hotel group the space. “We had many meetings,” says Antonioli, who as a teenager had spent two summers at a seminary near his home in the mountains before he was kicked out, he says, because  he “was too creative.” He spent a lot of time getting to know the men on the other side of the negotiations. “One day they took me to this hospital, for the super unlucky of the world, and they took me there to show me: This is what we do every day…. They told me, ‘Mr. Antonioli, remember you could have been on this side of the table,’ ” he says, referencing his seminary summers.

Soon spacious hotel rooms, on the second and third floors of the building, will replace the once austere seminary rooms. The former chapel on the ground floor will become an outpost of Beefbar, the Monaco-based steakhouse chain. An all-day casual restaurant will extend into a new garden out back.

The swimming pool, excavated from the seminary’s old basement dining hall, will open just down the hall from the Longevity Suite, a health spa offering antiaging cryo treatments. A roof bar is in the planning long-term. Shopping, along the ground-floor colonnade, will include boutiques from Antonia, the Milan-based concept store, along with the first shop from Leonardo’s 32-year-old daughter, Maria Sole Ferragamo, who produces jewellery from discarded brass and leather strips through her So-Le Studio brand.

www.wsj.com

 

Here follows the start of the last feature:

Fashion: 1960s-Style Tights Are Back. How to Wear Them in 2022

From their modest beginnings to the chicest styles to buy now, the complete history of snazzy hosiery. Plus, tips for prolonging the life of your favourite pairs.

By Nancy MacDonell / Photographs by F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal, Styling by Lizzy Wholley

Nov. 23, 2022

FIVE YEARS AGO, Radhika Jones walked into her first meeting as the editor in chief of Vanity Fair. The internet erupted with commentary—not all of it kind. This chatter had nothing to do with Ms. Jones’s impressive résumé or editorial vision but instead focused on a pair of cartoon-fox-printed tights she reportedly wore. The incident ended happily, with Vogue editor in chief Anna Wintour hosting a welcome dinner for her new colleague and gifting fox tights to all the guests.

The implication, however, was clear: Tights, especially ones a kindergartner could plausibly wear, weren’t cool. That’s changing. Ms. Jones has been vindicated, judging from the designs on offer this season: Gucci’s logo pattern, Prada’s metallic stripes and Mugler x Wolford’s double-seam styles, not to mention the plaid or mushroom-print versions brands like Hot Topic and Free People sell.

What makes the return of eye-catching tights so notable? Going barelegged, even in the northern latitudes in mid-January, has long been the fashion-sanctioned option, arguably since Michael Kors’s fall 1994 tights-free runway show. “Everyone said, ‘You wear black tights in winter,” Mr. Kors recently told a reporter. “And I said, ‘No.’” Other designers agreed and for years proposed fall collections that showed heavy woolen coats, turtlenecks and other cold-weather staples worn without hosiery.

Not everyone gave up tights. Katherine Homuth, the founder of Sheertex, based in Montreal, a city that experiences six months of winter, never saw the point of eschewing warmth for style. Sheertex’s indestructible tights, crafted from a proprietary polymer fibre, have gained a following since their 2019 launch, she said, because they solve a problem that is pertinent to most women’s lives. “It was like, we can send people to space but we can’t make tights that last more than a day? It didn’t make sense to me,” she said. The first pattern she added to her line, based on customer requests, was a sheer polka dot; she’s since introduced chevrons and argyles.

Although tights were invented in the 19th century, initially only stage performers wore them. Up until the 1960s, as they had for centuries, women wore stockings. Although the terms are sometimes used interchangeably, stockings differ from tights in that they cover only the leg and foot and need to be fastened to another garment—historically, a corset, girdle or garter—to stay up (the exception is the thigh-high stay-up, a relatively recent invention). Modesty and social convention decreed stockings were worn, no matter how high the mercury climbed, a dictum that persisted into the late-20th century. Until the rise of hemlines in the late 1910s and early 1920s, stockings were opaque and, though not on public display, often brightly colored and patterned. Once shorter skirts exposed legs, however, the nude look, preferably in sheer silk, became the ideal. But silk stockings were fragile, didn’t stretch and were a challenge to launder.

After WWII, there were ‘nylon riots’ around the country as women queued up, not always peacefully, to get a pair.

When nylons, made of their new namesake wonder-synthetic, came on the market in May 1940, they were still only available as stockings, but the promise of more durable hosiery prompted women to buy four million pairs in two days. But the euphoria was short-lived. Nylon was requisitioned for military use in 1942 and unless you were willing to turn to the black market, nylon stockings proved elusive. When they went on sale again post-WWII, “nylon riots” erupted around the country as women queued up, not always peacefully, to get their hands on a pair.

More than a decade passed before hosiery’s next revolution, which transformed nylon stockings into sheer nylon tights intended for everyday wear—what we now call pantyhose. “Panti-Legs,” as they were first awkwardly known, debuted in 1959, the brainchild of Allen E. Gant, Sr. and his wife, Ethel Boone Gant, who created the prototype by sewing stockings to a pair of underpants. It took the ’60s advent of the miniskirt for tights to be embraced. The brevity of the mini ruled out stockings, and hosiery with graphic punch complemented exposed legs. Tights weren’t just convenient—with quirky prints and colors, designers like André Courrèges and Mary Quant showed that tights were fun. Like the miniskirt, they represented freedom from rigid dress codes.

All the dotted and flowered legs we’re seeing now recapture something of that exuberance. “We became so casual [during lockdown]; we gave everything up,” said Silvia Azzali, Wolford’s chief commercial officer. “Beauty…was forgotten. Tights give a makeup effect that is all about beauty.”

The rules that once kept women in stockings year-round are long gone, but one look at the recent runways proves that interest in decorative legwear is keen. The difference is that wearing it (or not) isn’t a mandate, but a choice.

GET TIGHT WITH THESE

Five pairs to make a bold impression and get people talking for all the right reasons

Leggo My Logo

A snazzy insignia-print pair.

Tights, $380, Gucci.com; Gucci Pumps, $920, Dover Street Market New York, 646-837-7750

Glittery Gams

A crystal-studded style.

Sergio Rossi x Wolford Tights,

USD 515, WolfordShop.com; Manolo Blahnik Sandals, USD 1165, NeimanMarcus.com

WolfordShop.com; Pumps, USD 1575, Versace, 212-735-9132

Toe the Line

An elongating striated option.

Tights, USD 69, Sheertex.com; Pumps, USD 1145, ManoloBlahnik.com

Printed and Pink

A groovily geometric iteration.

Printed and Pink

Tights, USD 375, Versace, 212-735-9132; Loafers, USD 480, us.Nomasei.com

 

Tights-Saving Tips From a Legwear Addict

A guide to prolonging the life of your favourite hose

Illustration: Federica Del Proposto

So you’ve splurged on a nice pair of tights. Maybe they have a satin finish, or crystals, or a logo print that somehow renders them three times the price of other tights. Don’t destroy them after a few wears. Here, an avid tights-wearer (who’s learned the hard way) offers four tried-and-true tips for making your hose last.

  1. Hand wash them. Use mild detergent and warm water and turn them inside out. If you must use your Whirlpool, put your tights in a lingerie bag—but don’t toss in any actual lingerie. Bra hooks are homicidal.
  2. Never put them in the dryer. Instead, lay flat to dry. Heat messes with fabric. The last time I dried thigh-high holdup tights on low heat, it ruined the elastic and I ended up with my hose around my ankles on Madison Avenue.
  3. Wear cotton gloves to slide them on—seriously. This eliminates any risk of nails or rough skin snagging your hose. Also, rings are tights’ nemeses. Keep them away.
  4. Yes, that nail polish trick works. Apply clear polish to the edges of a run or hole. I’ve also found hair spray effective—if you use a lot of it and opt for an extra-strong-hold (and usually super-noxious) iteration.

—Katharine K. Zarrella

The Wall Street Journal is not compensated by retailers listed in its articles as outlets for products. Listed retailers frequently are not the sole retail outlets.

www.wsj.com

 

 

Newsletter of last Week

‘Sad Beige’ Has Taken Over Baby Gear, Clothing, Décor – The Inside Story of Adele’s Vegas Wardrobe – She Was In the CIA. Now She Makes Pyjamas for the Royals https://textile-future.com/archives/100199

 

Higlights of the News of last week, for your convenience just click on the item

 

Assoiciations

Orders and sales of the German manufacturers of Textile Care, Fabric and Leather Technologies https://textile-future.com/archives/100119

AATCC Textile Chemistry versus Textile Design https://textile-future.com/archives/100348

Automotives

Subsidies Supercharge GM’s EV Strategy  https://textile-future.com/archives/100185

Aviation

Airbus, Air Canada invest in Canadian climate solutions firm  https://textile-future.com/archives/100128

Awards

Indorama Ventures’ Deja™ Brand wins Best Sustainable Product Award  https://textile-future.com/archives/100303

Carbon

Industry calls for action on Sustainable Carbon Cycles https://textile-future.com/archives/100413

Companies

Gap beats on third-quarter revenue, but tempers expectations for holiday season https://textile-future.com/archives/100134

Does the Pareto Principle work in spinning? https://textile-future.com/archives/100251

Course of Business of the Swiss EMS Group https://textile-future.com/archives/100402

Coffee

Nespresso, pioneer of premium single-serve coffee, unveils new range of home compostable coffee capsules https://textile-future.com/archives/100267

Competition

PETA launches USD 1 million vegan wool challenge https://textile-future.com/archives/100318

Cotton

ICAC: Countries Are Fighting Inflation by Raising Interest Rates, but Recession Fears Mandate a Cautious Approach https://textile-future.com/archives/100124

Data

Secondary sector production in Switzerland rose in 3rd quarter 2022 by 3.4 % https://textile-future.com/archives/100084

More than half of EU businesses innovate https://textile-future.com/archives/100103

Premium decreases from 2021 to 2022 had no influence on Swiss disposable income https://textile-future.com/archives/100236

Higher incidence of road fatalities in EU rural areas   https://textile-future.com/archives/100283

Considerable changes in Swiss household budget in 2020 https://textile-future.com/archives/100341

Podcast on regional statistics : a magnifying glass on the EU https://textile-future.com/archives/100446

Steady employment growth continued in Switzerland in 3rd quarter 2022  https://textile-future.com/archives/100560

In 2021, a quarter of jobs in Switzerland were found in multinational enterprise groups https://textile-future.com/archives/100573

Department Stores

Harrods Bets on Fine Dining for the Future of Its Luxury Brand https://textile-future.com/archives/100293

Eggs

Swiss Nestlé: Launching an affordable, nutritious, shelf-stable plant-based egg alternative  https://textile-future.com/archives/100553

ESA

Switzerland has new ESA astronaut https://textile-future.com/archives/100461

EU

EU Commission welcomes political agreement to launch IRIS², the Union’s Secure Connectivity Programme https://textile-future.com/archives/100087

EU Commission proposes a new EU instrument to limit excessive gas price spikes https://textile-future.com/archives/100345

Events

For the first time at INDIA ITME 2022: Saurer shows air-spinning machine Autoairo   https://textile-future.com/archives/100152

Groz-Beckert on site at India ITME 2022 https://textile-future.com/archives/100365

INDIA ITME 2022 – Do’s and Don’t’s https://textile-future.com/archives/100426

Oerlikon at the ITME 2022: Sustainable plant solutions for the manmade fibre industry in India and Bangladesh https://textile-future.com/archives/100485

Five from Finland

Five from Finland: Travelling  https://textile-future.com/archives/100541

Hong Kong

Venture Fund: Engine Propelling Tech Start-ups in Hong Kong https://textile-future.com/archives/100356

McKinsey

McKinsey: How can everyone get a slice of the pie ? https://textile-future.com/archives/100566

India

Aditya Birla Group brings Galeries Lafayette to India https://textile-future.com/archives/100116

Luxury brands unveil India Collections https://textile-future.com/archives/100296

Mail Order Business

Zalando discontinues its resale platform Zircle  https://textile-future.com/archives/100310

OECD

OECD Development Centre releases new policy toolbox for a just low carbon transition of fossil fuel producer and mineral-rich developing economies https://textile-future.com/archives/100278

Following the official launch of the Equitable Framework and Finance for Extractive-based Countries in Transition (EFFECT) on 15 November at COP27 in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, the African Development Bank (AfDB) and the OECD Development Centre are pleased to announce that they will join efforts to implement EFFECT in Africa https://textile-future.com/archives/100466

Personalities

Robert Iger Returns as Disney CEO as Bob Chapek Is Ousted https://textile-future.com/archives/100243

Iger’s Return Has Disney Fans Overjoyed  https://textile-future.com/archives/100393

Change at the Executive Committee of the Swiss Employers’ Association (Schweizerischer Arbeitgeber Verband (SAV) https://textile-future.com/archives/100577

Romania

Romania: Benchmarks under the Cooperation and Verification Mechanism are satisfactorily met https://textile-future.com/archives/100370

Science

Swiss Empa: Plastic pollution: Scientists raise red flag – Chemicals could undercut global plastics treaty https://textile-future.com/archives/100374

Swiss Empa: Open Research Data Management (ORD) – Consortium wins funding for project on ORD practices https://textile-future.com/archives/100471

Sustainability

ISKO confirms its commitment as a global sustainability player https://textile-future.com/archives/100163

Marimekko launches collection made of post-industrial textile waste https://textile-future.com/archives/100314

Switzerland

Swiss Agreement with the United Kingdom on mutual recognition of conformity assessments  https://textile-future.com/archives/100080

Ukraine: Cash exchange to be discontinued in Switzerland  https://textile-future.com/archives/100097

Moderna applies to Swissmedic for authorisation of a second bivalent COVID-19 vaccine  https://textile-future.com/archives/100100

Federal Councillor Ueli Maurer invites financial sector to roundtable on artificial intelligence https://textile-future.com/archives/100107

Switzerland–United Kingdom: Services Mobility Agreement extended https://textile-future.com/archives/100274

Swiss Prevention of crime linked to prostitution: greater federal support possible https://textile-future.com/archives/100409

Swissmedic responsible for animal vaccines from January 1, 2023 https://textile-future.com/archives/100430

Swiss Federal Council brings ordinance on mandatory climate disclosures for large companies into force as of  January 1, 2024 https://textile-future.com/archives/100434

Swiss Federal Council brings amendments to Banking Act and Banking Ordinance into force with effect from January 1, 2023 https://textile-future.com/archives/100441

Switzerland participates in new ESA programmes and supports its ambitions for Europe in space  https://textile-future.com/archives/100455

State Secretary Hirayama opens Science Europe High-Level Workshop on Research Ethics and Integrity https://textile-future.com/archives/100517

Tannery

Leather tannery Ecco joins forces with mycelium material brand Ecovative  https://textile-future.com/archives/100175

Twitter

The Shelly Palmer Blog – Think about this https://textile-future.com/archives/100172

Elon Musk Reinstates Trump’s Twitter Account https://textile-future.com/archives/100192

USA

Patterns of US apparel trade and sourcing: latest trends and outlook  https://textile-future.com/archives/100322

Worth Reading

Issue 215 of Textile Outlook International has now been published  https://textile-future.com/archives/100420

Webinars

Fashion and Finance: The new realities of luxury consumers https://textile-future.com/archives/100381

WIPO webinar on copyright infrastructure – Cutting-edge Initiatives in the Private Sector to Improve Data Management (2) – December 7, 2022

IDTECHEX Webinar: Emerging Opportunities for Electromaagnetic Metamaterials (Dec.8, 2022) https://textile-future.com/archives/100569

WTO

WTO: WOMEN AND TRADE Five gender equality advocates chosen as ambassadors of the World Trade Congress on Gender  https://textile-future.com/archives/100090

Negotiations on Fisheries Subsidies:  WTO, Pacific Islands affirm cooperation for work on fisheries subsidies and key issues https://textile-future.com/archives/100113

E-COMMERCE: WTO members resume discussions on e-commerce following MC12 outcome https://textile-future.com/archives/100336